Friday, March 2, 2018

Claremont University - Global Mormonism Research Methodology Panel

I will be participating in a panel discussion called Challenges and Opportunities in Studying Global Mormonism at Claremont University in southern California on March 10th. Other panel participants will include Fred Axelgard, Henri Gooren, Caroline Kline, and Colleen McDannell. This event is free and open to the public, but you must register if you wish to attend. For more information, visit the Toward Global Mormon Studies Conference page on the Claremont University Mormon Studies website.

8 comments:

Mike Johnson said...

Best of luck at Claremont Graduate University.

Eduardo Clinch said...

Nice. Keep it up!

MainTour said...

Has anyone done an essay on the best LDS Ward Mission Plan (WMP)? Which ideas work better than others? Strengths and weaknesses in ward mission plans? Wouldn't you like to send your missionary to a ward with an awesome mission plan?

I have my essay online now (but I'm still cleaning it up) and I'm looking for similar such WMP's to compare it to. Isn't there a forum for ward mission leaders somewhere?

http://mormon.wikia.com/wiki/Scouting_Based_Ward_Mission_Plan

coachodeeps said...

Clayton Christensen wrote the book The Everyday Missionary. Good read and very useful. Also, the website had good stuff:
http://www.everydaymissionaries.org

James Anderson said...

Oresident Nelson is going to Kenya as part of that big trip just after Conference.

http://www.mormonnewsroom.co.ke/article/siblings-brenda-and-george-on-president-nelsons-upcoming-visit-

Eduardo Clinch said...

Religious studies within the social sciences is an interesting aspect of academia. It touches into many other fields such as history, philosophy, sociology, demography, ethnic studies. I find an aspect of it that is very interesting and perhaps untapped is economics. Do LDS get ahead financially because they abstain from alcohol and other drugs, while pooling together the higher rates of tithing and fast offerings?
Some people accuse the Church of being a corporation, but the "business" model of how Mormons fund their efforts and work pro bono in most cases is perhaps a case study to compare against other comtemporary and historical models.
How do SDAs and JWs do it? What about other faiths?
Also, how does the LDS Church change its policy per country?

Eduardo Clinch said...

As far as economics, every volunteer or non-profit organization has labor hours dedicated to its programs and maintanance/expansion. Some focus on the two year (or more or less) full time commitment of the missionaries, which is unique in this day and age, but apart from that is the regular lay clergy and other organizational labor hours given. Can we calculate per unit all the hours given in a wéek? Maybe a regular ward would be at least 200?
A bishop gives around 20, others contribute...

John Pack Lambert said...

While the commitment of full-time missionaries gets the most attention it is only one of many. Most members contribute their time to the work of the Church. Stake service missionaries contribute huge amounts although their exact number varry. Bishoos storehouses operate in most cases with no paid staff. The one I often volunteer at has one full time missiobary couple, plus I believe 3 or so volunteers who put in 10 plus hours a week, plus four drivers who do 6 hour shifts twice a month.

Seminary, institute and BYU-Pathway intern ational all very much depend on volunteers.

There are about as many church service missionaries as full time missionaries.