Wednesday, December 17, 2014

LDS Presence in Vietnam No Longer Sensitive

The Church has recently reclassified its presence in Vietnam from sensitive to non-sensitive. This change appears attributed to the Church obtaining government recognition earlier this year. Currently the Church in Vietnam reports one district located in Hanoi (organized on December 12th, 2010) and four branches (Hanoi, Hanoi District Branch, Tan Son Nhat, and Thao Dien). Full-time missionaries serving in the Cambodia Phnom Penh Mission speculate that larger numbers of missionaries may be assigned and additional cities outside of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City may open to proselytism within the near future.

Earlier this year the Church reported 1,600 members in Vietnam.

11 comments:

El Mirador said...

Good news for Vietnam. It also looks like Cuba might be getting close to having missionaries since the US and Cuba have resumed diplomatic relations.

Pascal said...

I was also really excited about Cuba. My personal guess is that it would be unwise to assign North American Missionaries there because of lingering negative sentiments, but since there are more South-American Missionaries than ever before and since efficiently opening Cuba would initially take only a handful companionships at most, I think the Church should go for it as soon as possible.

As for Vietnam, the news are even more exciting. Not much is changing from the governmental side at the moment, but I expect it to soon. With 1,600 members in the country, a large population, current legal lack of diversity among Missionaries serving and continuous outreach expansion in Cambodia, Vietnam is even an underdog candidate for its own Mission.

Iris and Craig said...

Great news! :D

Mike Johnson said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mike Johnson said...

Relations with Cuba haven't been normalized. However, that is being worked on. First step is opening embassies. It will still take some time for further steps. There is hope and it is time to open up relations.

I have long looked forward to this development with Cuba. It is my belief that as soon as they can legally, the Cuban American community will buy up every important place in Cuba, with a dramatic change in how Cuba is governed.

I think the Cuban government fears this and thus it may take time before relations are normalized. Today was a very important first step. And when it happens, I think Cuba will be changed dramatically.

Michael Worley said...

Great news, as had already been stated.

El Mirador said...

It is unfortunate that US policy has stopped Cuba from having access to the gospel. I wonder why missionary placement was never tried by assigning missionaries from Mexico or the DR. Also, it has already been announced that embassies will be opened.

John Pack Lambert said...

Is it possible the Church will open a mission in Vietnam next year?

John Pack Lambert said...

To what extent does US/Cuba relationships affect the Church? The Church is an international organization, with such areas as Mexico run entirely by Mexican nationals in thearea presidency. So there are enough non-US general authroties to open the Church in a country without involving Americans at all. This will probably be easier when there is a LAtin American aposlte, which I hope to see soon.

Mike Johnson said...

A number of apostles have visited Cuba in the last 3 years. All US citizens. David Bednar dedicated Cuba in 2012.

It isn't US policy, but Cuban policy that has limited the Church in Cuba.

Bryce said...

Matt was quoted several times by Deseret News on Dec 17th regarding the Church presence in Cuba, I should have posted it that day, way to go Matt! http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865617959/How-would-LDS-be-affected-by-renewed-US-Cuba-relations.html?pg=all#xqidCAsCOBegOyJ4.14